Delayed-Action, Self-Timers - Antique and Vintage Cameras

Kodak self-timer

c. 1918

Early Model

Eastman Kodak Co.

Rochester

USA

Image of Kodak self-timer

Delayed action device. Spring powered, pneumatic delay. Variable delay between s - 3m, set by wheel on base. Fitting for cable release. Patented Feb 12 1918.

Later Model

Delayed action device. Spring powered, pneumatic delay. Variable delay between s - 1m, set by rotating the top of the plunger. Fitting for cable release.

With:
Instructions, box.

References & Notes:
BJA 1921, p. 45. Westminster cat 1930, p. 33. Westminster Cat 1939, p. 16.

Haka Autoknips

Model 1

H. Klappenrot

Hamburg

Germany

Delayed action device. Clockwork. Fits a cable release.

With:
Box.

Model 11

Delayed action device with slow speed timer for speeds between - 10s. Clockwork. Fits a cable release.

With:
Box.

Model 11

Delayed action device with slow speed timer for speeds between - 9s. Clockwork. Fits a cable release.

With:
Instructions, box.

One of the most popular delayed action devices.

References & Notes:
Minit&Cine 1938, p. 264. Westminster Cat, 1939, p. 16. Ganzini Cat 1926.

Photoclip

Model A

Perrot & Co.

Bienne

Switzerland

Attributes:
Delayed action device. Clockwork.

Model B

Delayed action device with slow speeds. Clockwork.

References & Notes:
BJA 1924, p. 701. BJA 1925, p. 718.

Slow Speed Timer

1890s

Slow speed timer, air-valve type to fit within the tube of a bulb release.

Notes:
Marked Patent 226954. Possibly a Registered Design number, which would date to 1894.

Antinous Release

Cable Release
. 1920s. Contessa-Nettel, Stuttgart. Compur Fitting. Box.

Antinous Release
. 1900s. W. Watson & Sons, London. Bowden type cable. Fitting for a roller-blind shutter.

Watson were quick to produce a release using the Bowden design, judging by their advertisements they must have formed a specialist product line for them. Many types of fitting were made.

References & Notes:
BJA 1903, p. 1229. BJA 1906, p. 1205.

Ensign Body Release

1930s

Ensign Ltd

London

England

This screws into the tripod socket, an ordinary cable release attaches to the shutter release with its other end pushed into the Body Release. Also sold as the Trix.

Notes:
Marked patent applied for.

With:
Box.

References & Notes:
Westminster Cat. 1939, p. 140.

Fortex Time Valve

1912

F. W. Baxter

London

England

Image of Fortex Time Valve

Delayed action device, pneumatic delay between ⅛ - 3s. Fits a cable release.

Notes:
Address: 17 Chryssell Rd. Brixton. S.W.9.
Agents: Griffins', Kingsway, London.

With:
Instructions, box. Reducing washer to fit cable release.

The end of the piston is fixed to the cable release and drawn out. To make the exposure the piston and cylinder are pushed together by hand.

References & Notes:
BP 25463/1912 (Provisional patent that does not seem to have been completed.). Kodak Cat. 1921, p. 70.


Delayed action devices appeared in the 1900s. Often combined with a slow speed timer. Slow speed attachments appeared in the 1890s in the form of valves for fitting within the tube of a bulb release. Later models using clockwork fitted to the end of a wire release or directly to the cable release socket.

The antinous release was used in photography from around 1900 and quickly replaced the bulb release.

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