Kodak paper - Antique and Vintage Cameras

Solio

1892

Eastman Kodak Co.

Rochester

USA

Image of Solio

Printing-out paper.

  • Box of 72, 6 ½" x 8 ½" papers. SM. Matt. Kodak Ltd. address.
  • Packet of 15, 3 ½" x 5 ¾" papers. Glossy mauve. Kodak Ltd. address.

Solio was available in a tinted base - pink, mauve - as well as white and with glossy, matt and velvet surfaces. A self-toning Solio and a version for use in the tropics - No. 2 Solio - with a hardened base were available.

References & Notes:
BJA 1900, p. 270. BJA 1905, p. 206. BJA 1917, p. 57. BJA 1921, p. 38. BJA 1932, p. 30.

Nikko

Bromide paper.
Packet of 12, 9 x 12 cm papers. Pale mauve. French packaging. Retailer's address F. Dorsemaine & Cie, Vichy.

References & Notes:
BJA 1900, p. 269.

Kodura

c. 1911

Gelatine chloro-bromide development paper.
Box of 144, 6 ½" x 8 ½" papers. E. Cream smooth matt, thick. Kodak Ltd. address.

Kodura was intended for the professional market, especially suited for portraiture. It gave either warm black velvety or sepia tones. Available as:

  • A - thin semi-matt, from c. 1911.
  • AC - thin smooth matt, from c. 1911.
  • B - thick semi-matt, from c. 1911.
  • C - thick smooth matt, from c. 1911.
  • E - thick cream matt, from c. 1911.
  • - thick cream semi-matt, from c. 1921.
  • BB - slow version of B, from c. 1920 until late 1920s.
  • CC - slow version of C, from c. 1920 until late 1920s.
  • EE - slow version of E, from c. 1920 until late 1920s.
  • E Special - as E but with natural surface, from c. 1926.
  • D - double-weight, white, medium rough matt, from c. 1928.
  • E Smooth - as E but with smooth surface, from c. 1928.
  • E Rough - as E but with rough surface, from c. 1928.
  • E Semi-matt - as E but with semi-matt surface, from c. 1928.
During the 1930s the range of surfaces was reduced and further reduced during the war. An ivory surface was introduced in the late 1940s by which time the standard Kodak names of surfaces were used. The BB, CC and EE versions were primarily for contact printing. A related paper was Kodura Etching Brown which gave brown tones.

References & Notes:
BJA 1912, p. 119. BJA 1918, p. 40. BJA 1921, p. 41. BJA 1922, p. 38. BJA 1927, p. 35. BJA 1929, p. 36. BJA 1947, p. 13.

Velox

Image of Velox

Gelatine silver chloride, gaslight development paper.

  • Packet of 12, 9 x 12 cm papers. Velvet normal. French packaging. Early packet with Nepera Chemical Co. symbol and Kodak name.
  • Packet of 22, 2 ¾" x 1 ¾" papers. Glossy vigorous. Blue label. Price 6d. Retailer's label John Innes, 118 High St. Elgin.
  • Packet of 22, 2 ¾" x 1 ¾" papers. Art vigorous. Blue label. Price 6d. Retailer's label as above.
  • Packet of 22, 2 ¾" x 1 ¾" papers. Glossy vigorous. Nepera name on label. Price 6d. Retailer's label as above.
  • Packet of 12, 3 ½" x 2 ½" papers. VV1 art soft. Kodak Ltd. address.
  • Packet of 11, 3 ½" x 5 ¾" papers. VV2 velvet normal. Kodak Ltd. address.
  • Packet of 26, 3 ½" x 2 ½" papers. VV3 velvet vigorous. Kodak Ltd. address.
  • Packet of 22, 2 ¾" x 1 ¾" papers. VG2 glossy normal. Kodak Ltd. address. Hand written note: bought 13/9/33.
  • Packet of 26, 3 ½" x 2 ½" papers. VG3 glossy vigorous. Kodak Ltd. address.
  • Packet of 25, 3 ½" x 2 ½" papers. VG3 glossy vigorous. Kodak Ltd. address.

Velox was first produced by the Nepera Chemical Co. in c. 1897. In 1899 Nepera was bought out by Eastman. It was invented by Leo Baekeland who went on to develop Bakelite. Surfaces were (in Great Britain):

  • Glossy - until 1947.
  • Art - semi-gloss, discontinued around 1940.
  • Carbon - dead smooth matt, discontinued around 1940.
  • Portrait - semi-smooth, discontinued before 1931.
  • Velvet - same as art, introduced around 1940.
  • White Smooth Glossy - from 1947.
  • White Velvet Lustre - from 1947.
  • Cream Smooth Glossy.
Grades were:
  • Soft.
  • Medium - from c. 1926, also called normal.
  • Vigorous.
  • Contrast - from c. 1932.
  • Extra Soft - introduced early 1930s.
  • Extra Contrast - from late 1930s.

Velox Numbering System

Prior to 1947 Velox had its own numbering system, after that date Kodak standard designations were used. From c. 1929 the word 'Velox' was surrounded by an oval on the backs of glossy prints, this was to distinguish them when washing and prior to glazing.

References & Notes:
BJA 1900, p. 371. BJA 1912, p. 124. BJA 1918, p. 38. BJA 1922, p. 38. BJA 1927, p. 32. BJA 1932, p. 30. BJA 1933, p. 24. BJA 1936, p. 34. BJA 1939, p. 19. BJA 1947, p. 13. Phot. Journal 11/1930, p. 491.

Kodatone

c. 1922

Collodion, self-toning printing-out paper.

  • Packet of 9, 3 ½" x 5 ¾" papers. Glossy brilliant.
  • Packet of 14, 3 ¼" x 4 ¼" papers. Glossy brilliant.

Kodatone gave sepia to purple images. Toning was by a hypo bath preceded by a salt bath to give tones other than sepia. Several surfaces were produced including matt and glossy, on a white or cream base.

References & Notes:
BJA 1923, p. 36. BJA 1929, p. 38. BJA 1933, p. 24.

Kodak Bromide Paper

Gelatine silver bromide, developing-out paper.

  • Box of 144, 3 ½" x 4 ½" papers. BV-2 Z. Velvet medium, double-weight.
  • Box of 144, 5 ½" x 3 ½" papers. BV-2. Velvet medium, double-weight.

References & Notes:
BJA 1900, p. 269.


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