Blendux - Antique and Vintage Cameras

Blendux

1933

Gossen

Erlangen

Germany

Image of Blendux

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

For cine use.

Calibration:
Aperture: f1.5 - f32.

Notes:
Retailer's address in case: J.H. Dallmeyer Ltd. 31 Mortimer St. London.

With:
Instructions. Case. Box.

Ombrux

1933

Gossen

Erlangen

Germany

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

Calibration:
Scale on front of meter - 1/500 - 30s for f8 and 23 Scheiner. From tables - Film speed: 17 - 26 Scheiner. Shutter speed: 1/1000 - 960s. Aperture: f1.4 - f24.

Attributes:
Tables on two metal plates stored in the case are used for other apertures and film speeds.

With:
Case.

The Blendux was for cine use, the Ombrux, was for still photography. The Blendux is simple to use, a needle indicates the aperture required for a set film speed and f.p.s. value (16 f.p.s. with a shutter speed of 1/32). Tables are used for other films, shutter speeds and f.p.s. The price was 4.4.0. The Ombrux is similar to the cine version, a needle moves over a dial and shows the shutter speed for a set aperture and film speed, tables are consulted for other film speeds and apertures. The meters are dual range, pressing a button on the face of the meter activates the more sensitive scale.

References & Notes:
BJA 1934, p. 649. Westminster Cat 1939, p. 48.

Cimbrux

Gossen

Erlangen

Germany

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

Calibration:
Aperture: f1.5 - f32 using two scales. From tables - Film speed: 20 - 26 Scheiner. Shutter speed: 1/1000 - 20s. Aperture: f1.4 - f24.

Attributes:
Tables on two metal plates stored in the case are used for other apertures and film speeds.

With:
Case.

The Cimbrux was for cine use, similar to the Blendux.

Photoskop K

1933

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

Calibration:
Film speed: 4/10 - 19/10 DIN, 8 - 30 Scheiner. Shutter speed: 1/1000 - 100s. Aperture: f1.5 - f48.

Attributes:
French text.

Serial Number:
20670 .

The needle moves over a scale of shutter speeds that is connected to an aperture scale. In use the reading is taken and as the needle moves across the shutter speed scale the aperture ring can be turned to bring the required setting into a window. Alternatively the aperture is set first and the shutter speed is read when taking the reading. The price was 5.5.0.

References & Notes:
BJA 1935, pp. 130, 321.

Helios

1936

Zeiss-Ikon A. G.

Dresden

Germany

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

Calibration:
Film speed: 9 - 24 DIN, 20 - 35 Scheiner. Shutter speed: 1/1000 - 4s. Aperture: f1.4 - f16.

In use a dial is turned until a needle matches an index seen in the finder. The shutter speed and aperture pairs can then be read. In low light the needle can be matched to one of a series of values a multiplication table is then used to give the correct reading. Some versions of the meter do not have the DIN scale, others have only DIN. The meter was also known for a short while as the Helicon, that name was later used for a combined meter and rangefinder. Some versions have a baffle over the sensitive cell. Available with a foot to fit the accessory shoe of a camera.

Code Names:
1325

References & Notes:
BP 467039/1937. ZI Cat. 1937, p. 107.

Prix

1954

Josef Dorn

Neustadt an der Weinstrasse

W. Germany

Image of Prix

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

Calibration:
Film speed: 6 - 24 DIN, 3 - 200 ASA. Shutter speed: 1/2000 - 120s. Aperture: f1.4 - f45.

With:
Case.

Prix

Meter Type:
Photoelectric.

Calibration:
Film speed: 9 - 27 DIN, 6 - 400 ASA. Shutter speed: 1/2000 - 120s. Aperture: f1.4 - f45.

Attributes:
Black shutter speed scale, gold film speed scale.

With:
Case.

The needle moves over a scale of shutter speeds. A quadrant-shaped plate carries the aperture scale and an index, this is rotated to align the index with the needle, the shutter speed and aperture pairs can then be read. The plate carrying the aperture scale has a window showing film speeds, setting a film speed in the window moves the index relative to the aperture scale. The layout is interesting, the needle is pivoted near the bottom right corner of the meter, the index plate is pivoted at the opposite corner, the shutter speed dial is concentric with the index plate. Once the film speed is set on the index plate only a single movement is needed to read the full set of shutter speed and aperture pairs, but at the extremes of the shutter speed scale the needle is at a near tangent to the scale.

The meter was first produced in 1939 and with few changes it was re-introduced in 1954. Pre-war models had a flap covering the meter cell and dial. The meter shown in the Westminster catalogue of 1939 named the Grand-Prix has the letters RES on the cover. A very similar meter was sold in Britain as the Chum.

References & Notes:
Westminster Cat. 1939, p. 49. BJA 1956, p. 2210. DBP 916233.

Photoelectric

Metrophot, Eos, Horvex

Prinsen, Electrodrem, Sixtus
Electro Bewi

Blendux, Ombrux, Cimbrux
Photoskop, Helios, Prix

Avo, Smethurst

Tempophot, Tempiphot
Excelsior, Photoscop, Rex

Weston 617, 650, 819
Leicameter, 850

Electrophot

Ilford, Metrovick

Ikophot

Avo, Chum
Picoskop, Universal, GEC

Sixtomat, Sixti, Sixon
Piccolo, Chrolon, Leica Meter
Mini Rex, Realt

Ultima, Ambassador
Petri, Polaroid, Vivitar

Weston Master

Canon Booster


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